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collage

Quiz.Collage.Buziak.2

As I wrote yesterday, collage – from the French word coller, to glue – is a technique of art production, primarily used in the visual arts where the artwork is made from an assemblage of different forms, thus creating a new whole.

And after a productive month in the studio – and preparing to throw-out the scattered newspapers and out-of-date street advertising posters used for paint spills and splashes – I looked at some areas of accidental spills and splashes with deeper interest and thought of a collage arrangement.

It took the remainder of the day to measure, select, tear and paste the three basic elements of this piece into place; carefully wrapping each piece of pasted paper around the edge of the canvas’ frame and then stapling in place for a permanent fix. Then I added an air-gun target, found at a fairground a few years ago and kept in my bag of printed ephemera, old maps, tickets, labels and wrappers, before finally dropping more blue paint “droppings” to tie the three bands of torn paper together.

I must add that visually and experimentally I am very excited by this piece. Although some viewers will look upon it as “grunge” I feel very encouraged by progress in a different direction with my artwork… maybe it is a seminal piece. Obviously I hope it sells… but if it doesn’t I will be equally pleased to have it hanging on my own walls for a long time to come!

This artwork is for sale at Saatchi Art…

http://www.saatchiart.com/art/Collage-Quiz/395193/2160101/view

Image © 2014 Ed Buziak

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StudioCollage.3.Buziak

Collage – from the French word coller, to glue – is a technique of art production, primarily used in the visual arts where the artwork is made from an assemblage of different forms, thus creating a new whole.

A collage may sometimes include newspaper and magazine clippings, bits of coloured or handmade papers, portions of other artwork or texts, photographs and other found objects, glued to a piece of paper or canvas. The origins of collage can be traced back hundreds of years, but this technique made a dramatic reappearance in the early 20th century as an art form of novelty.

The term “collage” was coined by both Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso at the beginning of the 20th century when collage became a distinctive part of modern art.

According to the Guggenheim Museum‘s online art glossary, collage is an artistic concept associated with the beginnings of modernism, and entails much more than the idea of gluing something onto something else. The glued-on patches which Braque and Picasso added to their canvases offered a new perspective on painting when the patches “collided with the surface plane of the painting.” Furthermore, these chopped-up bits of newspaper introduced fragments of externally referenced meaning into the collision… the juxtaposition of signifiers, “at once serious and tongue-in-cheek,” was fundamental to the inspiration behind collage – “Emphasizing concept and process over end product, collage has brought the incongruous into meaningful congress with the ordinary.” – Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collage

And so after a productive month in the studio I thought it time to tidy-up the scattered newspapers and posters (out-of-date street advertising posters) I use as floor protection against paint spills and splashes. But, the more I looked at some areas of accidental spills and splashes the more I thought they could be used in some form of assemblage… or collage.

After much selecting, measuring, tearing and overlaying, I mixed a small bowl of wallpaper paste and carefully glued the three strips to an 80 x 60 cms stretched canvas. I then weighed the covered canvas down on each corner with my hand-exercise weights to make sure the wooden frame stayed true and flat whilst drying. By tomorrow I will know whether or not, or perhaps what, to add to the assemblage.

The finished artwork will be for sale at Saatchi Art in 24-hours…

Image © 2014 Ed Buziak

Fireworks.2.Buziak

During the summer of 2013 I was based in a small hotel bedroom in central France and only had a very small area in front of a window overlooking the street below to practice my artwork… basically it was a side-table with a few layers of thick, 40 x 30 inch salvaged cardboard which had sufficient overlap (underlap?) when working with my favoured 30 x 22 inch sheets of “Arches Platine” paper. Partly to protect the difficult-to-find large sheets of card (they were sourced from packaging life-size, cut-out advertising models demonstrating diet supplements in the local pharmacy window display) I also used cheap brown wrapping paper under the edges of the art media to partly protect the backing card from my daily excesses of overlapping brushstrokes of paint and stray scrawls of pastel and oil crayon!

I don’t know how many times I scrapped and threw away the cheap brown paper which had been at the receiving end of my unintentional abstract graffiti strokes, but one day I started to look at the “collage” work of various artists on the internet and got the idea that perhaps I could incorporate my accidental throwaway designs into an artwork in their own right.

What basically happened was that I assembled layers of torn strips of my saved waste in various combinations until I had a pleasing composition, using colour, tone and basic (or rather opposing) directions of the brushstrokes to create a finished piece. Sometimes I thought of “skyscape” as the subliminal theme… but more often than not “fireworks” came to mind.

This “Fireworks #2” collage is made up of acrylic, abstract painted strips randomly torn and glued to a 40 x 30 cms (nominal) sheet of Canson 160gms/98 lbs cartridge paper. The colour palette includes Deep Ultramarine Blue, Cadmium Red, Deep Cadmium Yellow, and is now available at Saatchi Art…

http://www.saatchiart.com/art/Collage-Fireworks-2/395193/2144745/view

Images © 2013 Ed Buziak

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