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Balloons.4.Buziak.2

After a fourth and fifth day (last weekend) in the studio working specifically on ‘dribble’ paintings I decided to take a break from that subject and technique to experiment and create in other areas… currently I have many ideas in my head and not enough hours in the day to proceed on more than one of them at a time. I suppose I’m lucky to be in a position where I’m not stuck for an idea! So, here is the last current one of the series on 75 x 55 cms card… a multi-coloured release of balloons floating upwards…

This painting is currently for sale at Saatchi Art…

http://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Organic-State-4-Balloons/395193/2159750/view

Image © 2014 Ed Buziak

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OrganicState.3.Buziak.2

A fourth day in my studio on ‘dribble’ paintings… but with only one completed. I worked on two large pieces yesterday and then this morning along the same theme, but using different colours from the red, orange and yellow part of the colour charts.

For this third piece of artwork in the on-going “Organic State” series I have used a ‘warm’  palette of colours on smooth Arches Platine cold-pressed, hand-made 76 x 56 cms (30 x 22 inches) watercolour paper. Again I have tried to express the slow movement of organic forms intermingling with each other, sometimes blending or fusing. Last evening a friend posted on Facebook the comment, “Thousands of balloons” against the multi-coloured “Organic State #1” which I had simply not seen before in that way.

OrganicState.3.Buziak.3

For a few days I had been imagining a downward movement in these abstract compositions – moving with the gravitational flow of the paint. Strangely, my friend saw an upward direction with balloons… and bizarrely, at the same time as I edited my WordPress blog text and Saatchi Art keywords list to include, “or are they swimming upwards like sperms?” and “sperm”.

When I checked the number of works for sale on Saatchi using the keyword “balloons” there were 872 hits (I thought there could have been more)… whereas “sperm” produced 136 hits which was more than I thought. So for the two latest “Organic State” artworks, which are more monochromatic, I will include “Sperm Count” in their titles.

This painting is currently for sale at Saatchi Art…

http://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Organic-State-Sperm-Count-3/395193/2154406/view

Images © 2014 Ed Buziak

OrganicState.2.Buziak.2

I’m continuing to work in my studio on ‘dribble’ paintings whilst the extra-warm weather is allowing me to overlay several coats of paint in a single day without them smudging, mixing or merging… and I see on the French météo report that fair weather is set to continue until at least next Wednesday when some rain might arrive. Actually, the prospect of some rain is tempting me to lay-out a few large sheets of pre-painted watercolour paper to see if and how the effects of raindrops (will it be light drizzle or lashing stair-rods?) are at blending perhaps a multi-colour background with spots and spatters of colour introduced during the natural precipitation

I completed two large pieces yesterday (“Organic State #1” was uploaded last night) and started a third on the same theme later in the afternoon using a sheet of 75 x 56 cms thin, buff-coloured cardboard rather than watercolour paper to as to study the absorbency effect and also to see how the tonality of the paint changed on a more absorbent, duller surface… and is still at an experimental stage as I drop extra colours onto it.

For this second piece of artwork in the on-going “Organic State” series I have used a ‘cold’ blue, black and white palette of colours on a 45° sloping sheet of heavy, smooth Arches Platine cold-pressed, hand-made watercolour paper 76 x 56 cms (30 x 22 inches) in size in trying to express the slow movement of organic forms intermingling with each other, sometimes blending or fusing, but in the main reaching downwards in search of an unseen connection… or are they swimming upwards like sperms?

This painting is currently for sale at Saatchi Art…

http://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Organic-State-2/395193/2152941/view

Image © 2014 Ed Buziak

Atelier.Buziak.3

Have been working in my studio for much of the day on ‘dribble’ paintings using a fully-charged brush of slightly watered-down (between milk and single cream in consistency) acrylic paint on a 45° sloping sheet of heavy, smooth watercolour paper 64 x 45 cms (25 x 17.5 inches) in size. The extra-warm weather allowed me to overlay several coats of paint in a single day without them smudging, mixing or merging. Normally in the cooler months a work of this apparent complexity would have to be spread over two days to allow for drying.

I completed two large pieces today (“Organic State #2” will be uploaded tomorrow) and started a third on the same theme later in the afternoon using a sheet of 75 x 56 cms thin, buff-coloured cardboard rather than watercolour paper to as to study the absorbency effect and also to see how the tonality of the paint changed on a more absorbent, duller surface.

OrganicState.1.Buziak.2

Here in “Organic State #1” I have used a full palette of colours in trying to express the slow movement of forms intermingling with each other, sometimes blending or fusing, but in the main reaching downwards in search of an unseen connection.

Original available for purchase at Saatchi Art online…

http://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Organic-State-1/395193/2151661/view

Images © 2014 Ed Buziak

ActionManBlue.Buziak.2

During the later stages of the recent football World Cup (which I didn’t watch on TV as I have no connection or access, even if I had wanted to… which I didn’t) I made a few visual scribbles from newspaper reports with brightly coloured wax crayons in a sketchpad recording which teams were playing each other by noting the dominant colours their national flags used, and in what pattern or sequence.

Perhaps thankfully, although it did help my thoughts on artistic composition, the English team were eliminated in the knock-out stages… I say thankfully because painting in an abstract style the Union Flag (what the BBC always incorrectly refer to as the Union Jack) would have been overly complex; and their strip, principally their shirts, being white would have been rather nondescript to say the least.

ActionManBlue.Buziak.3

Well, the World Cup has been played and won and won’t be around for another four years… so my opportunity to be literally “on the ball” with my timing of a portfolio of subjects to appeal to supporters of those sporting nations has no possibility of going into “extra time”. However, I do have a finished example of what I was thinking of for that particular the with “Action Man Blue” – a 60 x 80 cmd semi-abstract acrylic work on canvas, painted with the same broad 100 cms (4 inch) brush and a similar technique as described in my previous WordPress blog entry entitled “Scrape”.

This painting is currently for sale at Saatchi Art…

http://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Action-Man-Blue/395193/2149834/view

Images © 2014 Ed Buziak

Scrape.Buziak.2

I completed this 80 x 60 cms (31.5 x 23.5 inch) work during a couple of days intensive painting a few of weeks ago just after I’d been shopping for materials; because returning with six canvasses I found them simply too pristine to be left in that state in a corner of my studio!

Unusually for me I was in a black and white mood and so squeezed in turn, over the two days, long, straight lines of Indigo, Mars Black and Titanium White acrylics into large dishes so that I could charge just the tips of a 100 cm (4 inch) wide decorator’s paint brush with the very slightly water-thinned colours. I found that after each short, approximately four to six inch draw or drag of the paintbrush, I needed to wipe any excess paint off the brush with paper towels and basically dry the ends of the bristles before recharging them with fresh paint. This technique was necessary to keep the basic outline produced by the bristles sharp and well-defined across the white canvas.

Paintings which look relatively simple to produce are often, in fact, more complicated than meet the eye because of the necessity to allow – such as with this composition – each coat or layer of paint to dry thoroughly before applying another coat on top… even if it is the same tone or colour, because I did not want them to smudge, mix or merge.  Even though there are only three basic colours used in this work, there could be half a dozen layers in places where I have gone over the design in a different direction two or three times with white and again, or alternately, in black.

Scrape.Buziak.3

Although this painting is different to anything I have completed before it follows an “angular” theme I started on a few years ago with my adaptations of the General Vauban fortifications plans… basically lots of angles! It is one I often return to, although the results may look very different in isolation, but I’m sure that if I placed these works together in an exhibition a strong theme would stand out.

This painting is now for sale at Saatchi Art…

http://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Scrape/395193/2149315/view

Images © 2014 Ed Buziak

"Shatter #2" ~ Ed Buziak (2012)

"Shatter #2" ~ Ed Buziak (2012)

The above piece is one of a new and ongoing series of works using Conté Carrés (square) hard crayons on intentionally folded papers. There is almost a necessity to view these folded works with side-lighting so the three-dimensional nature of the folded paper reveals itself with the subtle tonal changes between the random angular planes in either light or shadow depending on the direction of the light.

I have worked with Conté Carrés crayons since my art college days back in 1962. From the Blick materials website http://www.dickblick.com/products/conte-crayons/

  • “Invented in France in 1795 by Nicolas-Jacques Conté especially for drawing and sketching, Conté Crayons are made from a blend of natural pigments, kaolin clay, and graphite. The Conté crayon has been used by many of the world’s greatest artists, including Picasso, Delacroix, and Degas.
  • The rich, vivid colors of Conté Crayons mix together nicely, and a range of effects can be consistently produced. They are well suited for use on newsprint, bristol, toned paper or heavily grained surfaces. Their rich opacity makes them ideal for work on darker papers and their quality ensures the longevity of drawings. Conté crayons are waxier and much firmer than soft pastels, so they produce little dust and are easy to control.”

My Conté crayons date from the 1930s and belonged to my wife’s uncle George who was a noted local artist in Devon between the two World Wars. I also use his extensive sets of Rembrandt soft pastels as well as a cache of assorted art papers of various tints and textures… all probably unavailable nowadays if I need to purchase more sheets to continue certain themes.

The variation in tone and pattern of the individual black and white crayon strokes was made by using the underlying texture of the corrugated “cardboard packaging” backing sheet I worked on and changing the angle of media to backing sheets between each application of line.

Image © 2012 Ed Buziak

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